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Walk On The Wild Side - Wild Food Wild Medicine

Walk On The Wild Side is a joint venture between, Craig Worrall (Edible Leeds) and Danielle Kay (Wise Woman Herbalist). We first started hosting walks together in 2014 and both hold the belief that 'food is medicine, medicine is food'. Our individual specialisms compliment each other quite naturally and beautifully and this is perfect for providing interesting, exciting, fun and informative walks - so we are often told. If you have an interest in nature, health, eating and healing then please do join us on a journey of discovery and delight, as we explore the wonderful world of wild foods and wild medicines. Let us tantalise your taste buds and alleviate your ailments with hidden gifts and treasures from Mother Nature.

Barnoldswick, July 2014

The summer episode of, Walk On The Wild Side, was held in Barnoldswick (Danielles home town), or 'Barlick', as the locals call it, on Sunday 6th July. Barnoldswick, which is in Lancashire, borders Yorkshire and despite the fact that Yorkshire was gripped by the fantastically, fabulous, fervour that was Le Tour De France - and rightly so, what an historic and momentous occassion - what a fabulous turn out we had! Huge thanks, from Danielle and myself, to everyone that joined us and made the walk the amazing experience it was. The route took in country lanes, open fields, wooded streams and parkland.The plants we focused on included; Ramsons, Meadowsweet, Hogweed, Ribwort/Broad-Leaved Plantain, Cleavers, Common/Wood Sorrel, Pignuts, Elder, Vetch and Wild Rose

This shaded little lane still had Wild Garlic Seeds prime for the picking. A sampling of sweet pickled Wild Garlic Seeds had to be had.





I'd taken along some pickled Hogweed Seeds for sampling, yet none of the Hogweed along the lane had actually come into seed. The majority of the plants along the lane were in flower. or just about to flower, so we discussed their edibility. Carine (red t-shirt), came up trumps and found some Hogweed flowers that were just emerging from their protective sheath - the prime stage for picking.


Danielle extolls the virtues of Ribwort and Broad-Leaved Plantain, both of which are fantastic herbal medicines. Danielle also brought along some freshly made herbal tea, a hayfever blend, which works surprisingly quick, and we were all were treated to a cup at this point.



Wild Rose (Rosa canina). Danielle discussed the medicinal properties/uses of this beautiful flower and proceeded to bring out one of her fabulous tinctures, 'Warrior drops' - as Danielle has aptly named it. This tincture, is being provided by the, Herbalists Against Fracking, for the campaigners based at various anti-fracking sites in the UK. The tincture has a calming effect, perfect combating trauma and upset caused by the environmentally damaging fracking.



Sampling the Warrior Drops.






A social and cook up at the end of the walk. Salmon with Sorrel Sauce and Wild Rocket. Elderflower and Orange Cake. Elderflower Cordial. Elderflower and Meadowsweet Fritters with Meadowsweet Juice.













If you would like to join us on a, Walk On The Wild Side yourself, with friends, family, as a group, or colleagues, please feel free to contact: edible.leeds@gmail.com or wisewomanherbalist@yahoo.co.uk
or call Craig on: 07899 752 447 or Danielle on: 07909 953 666. Walks can be tailored to suit specific requirements wherever possible. It's wild, it's wonderful!
 
                           

Otley, April 2014

A Walk On The Wildside, the first of a series of co-hosted walks by Craig Worrall (Edible Leeds) and Danielle Kay (Wise Woman Herbalist), was a great success. The day was spent looking at the edible/medicinal delights to be discovered along the riverbank and grassland beside the gently meandering and beautiful River Wharfe in Otley. Danielle brought with her, a range of homemade tinctures and fresh wild herb teas which added perfectly to the multi-sensory experience of the day. Along the way and toward the end of the walk, time was made available for the group to forage for fresh, wild herbs, foliage and flowers. Some of these were cooked up fresh on the banks of the river and others were included in a fresh, Wild Green Salad. Adding to the overall, happiness, wildness, energy and freedom of the day, as we sat to prepare our wild feast the sunshine burst through, scattering the clouds and bathing us with warm, radiant rays - perfect!


Discussing the properties of Cleavers                      The smiling tincturess









Serving up fresh herb tea


               

                             Cooking up Hogweed Shoots

                           


Prepping the Wild Green Salad




                     




A beautiful, fresh wild salad.                                    Tucking in!





  



Dandelion, Chickweed, Wild Garlic, Jack by the Hedge, Ground Elder, Sweet Cicely, Few Flowered Leek, Apple/Cherry/Ramson/Flowering Currant/Yellow Archangel Blossoms/Flowers, Magnolia Petals, Pickled Ceps and Gooseberries with a Raspberry Vinegar, Mustard Seed, Horseradish and Hemp Oil Dressing...

If you would like to join us on a, Walk On The Wild Side yourself, with friends, family, as a group, or colleagues, please feel free to contact: edible.leeds@gmail.com or wisewomanherbalist@yahoo.co.uk
or call Craig on: 07899 752 447 or Danielle on: 07909 953 666. Walks can be tailored to suit specific requirements wherever possible. 
 






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